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Related music by Ray Charles

Ray Charles

Blind Musician

Ray Charles was the musician most responsible for developing soul music. Charles devised a new form of black pop by merging ’50s R&B with gospel-powered vocals, adding plenty of flavor from contemporary jazz, blues, and (in the ’60s) country. Then there was his singing; his style was among the most emotional and easily identifiable of any 20th century performer. The brilliance of his 1950s and ’60s work, however, can’t obscure the fact that he made few classic tracks after the mid-’60s, though he recorded often and performed until the year before his death.
Blind since the age of six (from glaucoma), Charles studied composition and learned many instruments at the St. Augustine School for the Deaf and the Blind. His parents had died by his early teens, and he worked as a musician in Florida for a while before using his savings to move to Seattle in 1947. By the late ’40s, he was recording in a smooth pop/R&B style derivative of Nat “King” Cole and Charles Brown. He got his first Top Ten R&B hit with “Baby, Let Me Hold Your Hand” in 1951.
Throughout the ’50s, Charles ran off a series of R&B hits that, although they weren’t called “soul” at the time, did a lot to pave the way for soul by presenting a form of R&B that was sophisticated without sacrificing any emotional grit. But Charles didn’t really capture the pop audience until “What’d I Say,” which caught the fervor of the church with its pleading vocals, as well as the spirit of rock & roll with its classic electric piano line.
After hip replacement surgery in 2003, he scheduled a tour for the following summer, but was forced to cancel an appearance in March 2004. Three months later, on June 10, 2004, Ray Charles succumbed to liver disease at his home in Beverly Hills, CA. The biopic Ray hit screens in the fall of 2004 and was a critical and commercial success, with the actor who portrayedCharles in the move, Jamie Foxx, winning the 2005 Academy Award for Best Actor for his role.

(via All Music)

Ray Charles Interview Transcript

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